Indiana governor signs bills targeting LGBTQ students

Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb speaks with reporters at the Indiana Statehouse on Tuesday, April 4,...
Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb speaks with reporters at the Indiana Statehouse on Tuesday, April 4, 2023, in Indianapolis. On Wednesday, April 5, Holcomb signed a bill that bans all gender-affirming care for minors in the state despite expressing reservations that it vaguely written.(Tom Davies | AP Photo/Tom Davies, File)
Published: May. 4, 2023 at 4:43 PM EDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana’s governor on Thursday signed a bill that would require schools to notify a parent if a student requests a name or pronoun change at school, one of the final bills approved in a legislative session that had targeted LGBTQ+ people in the state, especially students.

Critics worry the law could out transgender children to their families and erode trust between students and teachers while supporters have contested the legislation keeps parents empowered and informed about their children when at school.

Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb’s approval of the legislation comes in a year when GOP-led legislatures around the country are seeking to curb LGBTQ+ rights, specifically targeting trans people’s participation in sports, workplaces and schools, as well as their access to health care.

Recently, Florida Republicans on Wednesday also approved a bill that would prevent students and teachers from being required to use pronouns that don’t correspond to someone’s sex, a bill Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis is expected to sign into law. Meanwhile, at least 16 states, including Indiana,have banned or restricted access to gender-affirming care such as hormones, puberty blockers, and surgeries.

Indiana’s name and pronouns law, which goes into effect July 1, would require school officials to provide written notification to a child’s parent or guardian within five business days of the child asking to be called a different “pronoun, title, or word,” according to the bill. It also prohibits, from prekindergarten through third grade, instruction on “human sexuality,” something that is not defined in the bill.

“I believe in parental rights,” Holcomb said in a statement Thursday. “I also just believe its commonsense that sex education should not be taught in prekindergarten through third grade.”

Holcomb also signed into law on Thursday a bill that could make it easier to ban books from public school libraries, staff at which would be required by July 1 to publicly post a list of books they offer and provide a complaints process for community members.

Schools and librarians could also no longer argue, as a legal defense, that the texts in their libraries have “educational” value. The law would still allow them to argue the text has literary, artistic, political or scientific value.

Those who supported the legislation expressed concern that sexually inappropriate or “pornographic” materials are available to children in school libraries. Critics, however, said the legislation could open the door to banning books or criminal prosecutions of librarians simply because some people don’t like the topics of the texts, particularly those with LGBTQ+ themes.

The law “improves transparency,” Holcomb said in a statement, adding he was “happy that these decisions will continue to take place at the local level.”

Latest News

Latest News