Cadaver dogs hit 20 locations at suspect serial killer’s Indiana property

12 families with missing loved ones contacted the coroner to get DNA swabs, WTHR reports
Cadaver dogs searched the Fox Hollow Farm property, the former residence of suspected serial...
Cadaver dogs searched the Fox Hollow Farm property, the former residence of suspected serial killer Herb Baumeister.(WTHR)
Published: Dec. 7, 2022 at 4:35 PM EST
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WESTFIELD, Ind. (WTHR) — Cadaver dogs hit on 20 different locations over the weekend during a search of the Fox Hollow Farm property, the former residence of suspected serial killer Herb Baumeister, according to police.

Those were spots on the property now marked with red flags where the dogs showed interest where there could be human remains.

Hamilton County Deputy and Coroner-elect Jeff Jellison also confirmed to 13News at least 12 families with missing loved ones contacted the coroner to get a DNA swab. Some of those families submitted requests from across the country.

The update comes as Jellison announced a renewed push to find human remains at the Westfield property, where the decomposed and charred remains of at least two dozen people were found 26 years ago.

Investigators searched the home of a man accused of killing multiple men in the 1980s and 1990s.
Investigators searched the home of a man accused of killing multiple men in the 1980s and 1990s.

Many of Baumeister’s victims have never been identified.

“These remains represent people. For the past 26 years, these people have been placed on a shelf at the University of Indianapolis, and that is not acceptable,” Jellison said. “We need to make every effort possible to identify these people and return them to their loved ones,” Jellison told 13News when the investigation began.

Investigators believe Baumeister targeted gay men, killing at least 25 people in the 1990s. In 1996, police found 10,000 bone fragments in the woods surrounding his home.

To date, eight victims have been identified. But, over the past 15 years, the current owner of Fox Hollow Farm has found more bones and bone fragments.

“We don’t go looking for them, but they do turn up and I take them to the University of Indianapolis,” said Robert Graves, who has lived on the property for the last 15 years.

He turns them over to the university’s forensic anthropology lab where they sit, joining the 10,000 others without identification.