Doc: Physicians considering leaving Indiana over impending abortion law

The ban, which takes effect Sept. 15, has some medical professionals and Hoosiers talking about leaving the state.
FILE - Pro-choice rally at the Indiana Statehouse on the first day of the Special Session
FILE - Pro-choice rally at the Indiana Statehouse on the first day of the Special Session(WTHR)
Published: Sep. 2, 2022 at 12:47 PM EDT
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INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (WTHR) — Indiana’s abortion ban goes into effect in two weeks.

Starting Sept. 15, abortions will be illegal except for certain cases like rape and incest.

The ban has some medical professionals and Hoosiers talking about leaving the state. It started with a text message from one doctor to another asking for “trauma surgery coverage” in October and December.

“This person responded, ‘No, and don’t send me any more offers. I’m not going to a place that doesn’t respect physicians and women,’” said pulmonary critical care Dr. Gabriel Bosslet. “It struck me as a real time look at the concerns that we have.”

Bosslet said those concerns surround Indiana’s abortion law.

“We didn’t have to make this decision. The Statehouse didn’t have to make this decision and put people in these situations,” said Bosslet.

Bosslet tweeted that message from a friend. He began receiving more, including one from a person who said they know someone who wants to leave Indiana to start a family.

It read, in part: “The MD she’s been working with specializes in high risk pregnancies and couldn’t in good faith recommend her being pregnant in Indiana.”

It goes on to say: “MD said her job is basically now telling patients they should move to another state. So frustrating and depressing.”

Bosslet said lots of people have messaged him, sharing personal stories.

“And they’re all heart-wrenching. A lot of them are about physicians who are leaving. I’ve had several physicians literally leaving the state who said, ‘I’m leaving I’ve put in my notice,” said Bosslet.

Indiana Attorney General Todd Rokita said he’s hearing a different story.

“I have not heard that it’s a problem anywhere. I can’t and I don’t think any Hoosier employers seriously think they’re going to lose employees because someone can’t get an abortion here in the state of Indiana. It’s just not an issue,” said Rokita.

Rokita said he’s traveled across the state speaking with Hoosiers. Bosslet said the Hoosiers he’s hearing from are expressing concern about their future in Indiana.

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